Identifying Species

Baby snakes are abundant in Maryland during the month of September. Young snakes often look different from their adult counterparts. According to the DNR, all snakes in the state are great for our environment in one way or another. Oftentimes, they are great for pest control by eating rodents and some bugs. Some of their venom is also being used to develop blood pressure medication.

Most snakes in the state are harmless, however, there are a handful of dangerous and venomous snakes lurking around. The Northern Copperhead and the Timber Rattlesnake both reside in Maryland. The DNR offered tips on how to identify them. In Maryland, venomous snakes have slit-like pupils, and extra sensory pit on either side of their head and a diamond-shape head that is much larger than the rest of its body.

For information on snake removal, visit On The Fly Pest Solutions.

Snake Baby Season In Maryland. Fun Facts About Them.

It’s baby snake season in Maryland, according to the Department of Natural Resources.

DNR said juvenile snakes often look different than adults.

All snakes in Maryland are great for pest control in one form or another, DNR reports. They help keep the rodent populations in check and even help by consuming ticks that are found on rodents. Read more

Summary: Baby snakes are abundant in Maryland during the month of September. Young snakes often look different from their adult counterparts.

How To Identify Maryland’s Venomous Snakes

Most of the snakes found in Maryland are not venomous — like the Northern brown snakes, rat snakes and garter snakes.

But there are two types of venomous snakes in Maryland — the Northern copperhead and the Timber rattlesnake.

The Maryland Department of Natural Resources’ Wildlife and Heritage Services offers tips on how to identify them.

Learn more

Summary: Most snakes in the state are harmless, however, there are a handful of dangerous and venomous snakes lurking around. The Northern Copperhead and the Timber Rattlesnake both reside in Maryland.